Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) Part III

Pissarro experimented with Neo-Impressionist ideas between 1885 and 1890. Discontented with what he referred to as “romantic Impressionism,” he investigated Pointillism which he called “scientific Impressionism” before returning to a purer Impressionism in the last decade of his life.


In March 1893, in Paris, Gallery Durand-Ruel organized a major exhibition of 46 of Pissarro’s works along with 55 others by Antonio de La Gandara. But while the critics acclaimed Gandara, their appraisal of Pissarro’s art was less enthusiastic.

Pissarro died in Eragny-sur-Epte on either November 12 or November 13, 1903 and was buried in Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. On his tomb it reads 12 November 1903.

During his lifetime, Camille Pissarro sold few of his paintings. By 2005, however, some of his works were selling in the range of U.S. $2 to 4 million.

Camille’s great-grandson, Joachim Pissarro, is currently the Head Curator of Drawing and Painting at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. His great-granddaughter, Lelia, is a successful painter and resides in London. From the only daughter of Camille, – Jeanne Pissarro, other painters include Henri Bonin-Pissarro also known as BOPI (1918-2003) and Claude Bonin-Pissarro (born 1921), who is the father of Frederic Bonin-Pissarro (born 1964).

See the beginning of this article in part I; part II



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