Charles Ephraim Burchfield (1893-1967) Part II

From 1912 to 1916 Burchfield attended the Cleveland School of Art. He returned to his home in Salem, Ohio, where he had an industrial job and in his spare time painted imaginative watercolors of nature. After military service in World War I, he worked as a wallpaper designer in Buffalo until 1929, when, having received critical acclaim and gallery representation, he was able to devote his time to art.

During the 1920s and ’30s Burchfield’s work was closely associated with that of the painter Edward Hopper because of its emphasis on the loneliness and harshness of American cities and small towns. In November Evening (1931–34), for example, weather-beaten buildings convey a mood of stark realism.

To be continued in part III
See the beginning of this article in part I



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